Detailed Activities

There is a Scratch studio called FunKey Sensor where activities are linked to some of these projects.

Heartbeat with Scratch

  • begin with board unconnected to computer

  • connect the heartbeat sensor pins to the cable as shown in the sensor page

  • connect the alligator cable ends: red to powerstrip, black to ground and yellow to the K port

  • open a text editor and click in the editing window

  • connect the FunKey Sensor board to the computer using the USB cable

  • hold the "heart image" side of the sensor gently but firmly to your finger tip

  • wait about 20 seconds and you should see "b" keys in the text editor matching your heart rate, about one per second

  • create a Scratch program the senses the "b" key and makes something happen, for example it makes a heart sprite get larger then smaller

  • example: https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/467927373

Proximity Sensor with Scratch

  • begin with board unconnected to computer

  • connect the proximity sensor pins to the cable as shown in the sensor page

  • connect the alligator cable ends: red to powerstrip, black to ground and yellow to the W port

  • open a text editor and click in the editing window

  • connect the FunKey Sensor board to the computer using the USB cable

  • place your hand about an inch away from the sensor's plastic lenses.  You should see an "o" when you bring your hand near the sensor and a "p" when you move it away

  • create a Scratch program that makes use of the "o" and "p" keys, perhaps to make a sprite "jump"

  • example:  https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/468068902

Tilt Sensor with Scratch

  • begin with board unconnected to computer

  • connect the tilt sensor pins to the cable as shown in the sensor page

  • connect the alligator cable ends: black to ground and yellow to the W port (only two connections)

  • go to this simple Scratch program that makes use of the "o" key, to make a sprite "jump"

  • https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/472085165

  • connect the FunKey Sensor board to the computer using the USB cable

  • when you tilt the sensor in one direction the sprite should jump up.

Reaction timer with Proximity Sensor in Scratch

  • begin with board unconnected to computerconnect the proximity sensor pins to the cable as shown in the sensor page

  • connect the alligator cable ends: red to powerstrip, black to ground and yellow to the W port

  • open a text editor and click in the editing window

  • connect the FunKey Sensor board to the computer using the USB cable

  • place your hand about an inch away from the sensor's plastic lenses.  You should see an "o" when you bring your hand near the sensor and a "p" when you move it away

  • this Scratch program makes use of the "o" key, to test your reaction time

  • example:  https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/471934998

Proximity sensor with LED

  • begin with board unconnected to computer

  • connect the proximity sensor pins to the cable as shown in the sensor page

  • connect the alligator cable ends: red to powerstrip, black to ground and yellow to the Up port

  • power the FunKey Sensor board using the USB cable to a computer or other USB source

  • consult the sensor page for connections to the pins on the RGB LED.  Only black and yellow are used.  Connect the RGB LED alligator clips to the board, with black and yellow wires.  Black clips to ground, and yellow to the Down port.

  • place your hand about an inch away from the sensor's plastic lenses.  You should see the LED light up when you bring your hand near the sensor and go dark when you move your hand away.

  • Similarly you can use proximity sensor attached to the Up port to control the Down port attached to the continuous motor (two wires like the LED) or the buzzer (all three wires needed)

  • Other sensors can work in this fashion, for example the light sensor attached to the Up port instead of the proximity sensor.

 Touch control with outputs

  • The Click port can be used as a touch input to control outputs attached to the Right or Left ports

  • You can touch the Click port directly with your finger or use a standard alligator clip to activate it by touching the end of the clip or attaching it to a piece of conductive material like aluminum foil.

  • The Right and Left ports are both controlled in this fashion by the Click port, but they act in opposite ways:  touching Click makes the Right port go "on".  touching Click makes the Left port go "off".  You can control outputs like the RGB LED, buzzer or continuous motor which are attached to the Right or Left ports.

  • Note that the Click port also sends a "c" keystroke to the computer, so if you are using a computer to power the board, you may get a sea of "c"s arriving at any program you might have open.