FunKey: The Kindernet of ThingsTM

 

Affordable plug-and-play products for STEM, science, invention, physical computing and coding. 

See "quick start" instructions and pictures below. See www.funkey.org for videos of projects.

Musical instruments

Inventions

Games and Game Controllers

Science

 

EZPass

Plant moisture

12 note instrument

No touch instrument

Pinball

Sensor Data directly into Scratch

Science Ramp Acceleration

Theremin

Heartbeat detection

Quick Start.  Text here, pictures below.

FunKey has 18 alligator "ports", some designed for sending keystrokes to Scratch or other programs or languages, some designed for "unplugged" activities and inventions with no computer necessary.

Keystroke mode: attach alligator leads to any of these 12 ports: WASDFG UP DOWN LEFT RIGHT SPACE OR CLICK.  Attach another alligator to any of the "ground" holes at the bottom of the board.  Hold the ground lead in one hand and touch any of the other alligators to send the corresponding keystroke to the computer via the USB cable.  Attach the alligators to metal, foil, etc to make game controllers or musical instruments.

Sensor Keystroke Mode:  Attach any sensor to WASDFG UP DOWN LEFT RIGHT SPACE OR CLICK.  The "out" sensor connection goes to the port.  The - or gnd sensor connection goes to one of the connections at the bottom of the board.  The + or VCC sensor connection goes to one of the connections at the top of the board.  Triggering the sensor will send the corresponding keystroke to the computer via the USB cable.  For ANALOG sensors like light, moisture, heartbeat, connect the sensor to the H port.  It will send keystrokes 0 to 9 and A to Z to represent the analog sensor's value. Use for timing speed, controlling games, analog theremins, heartbeat charting, etc.

Unplugged Sensor/Output activities. No computer needed.  Power the board from USB or battery. On the right side of the board there are 6 ports H I J K L M.  Connect a sensor to H and it will control a servo motor attached to the I port.  Connect a sensor to J to control the output of K and on L to control the output of M.  Outputs on K and M can be LEDs, buzzers and very lightweight motors. (note: the H analog port is used both for unplugged and also for keystroke to Scratch.)  Activities:  EZPass, heartbeat meter, moisture meter, light meter, ... 

Keystroke mode: alligators connected to any of 12 ports WASDFG Up Down Right Left Space Click.
One alligator connected to any hole on bottom row, "ground".
Hold the ground wire and touch any of the other wires and the corresponding keystrokes are sent to the computer running Scratch 

Sensor Keystroke mode, here shown connecting a proximity sensor to the W key: Sensor is connected to any of the 12 ports WASDFG Up Down Right Left Space Click.
Activate the sensor by placing an object or hand in front of the sensor, and the corresponding keystroke is sent to the computer running Scratch. Use for control, timing of moving objects, etc.

Analog Sensor Keystroke mode uses the H key, here connecting a heartbeat sensor. 

The sensor sends a range of keystrokes from 0 to 9 and A to Z to the computer running Scratch.  In this mode you get 36 levels of analog values sent to Scratch.  Typical sensors are heartbeat, light, moisture, ...
Examples:
Heartbeat sensor graphing to Scratch
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/575137615/editor
Moisture sensor graphing to Scratch
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/592193178/editor
Light sensor theremin
https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/573331694/editor

Another example of Analog Sensor Keystroke mode using the H key, here connecting a moisture sensor. 

Activate the sensor and a range of keystrokes from 0 to 9 and A to Z is sent to the computer running Scratch.  In this mode you get 36 levels of analog values sent to Scratch. You can graph sensor output or use it for fine control of Scratch elements. 

Unplugged "invention" mode uses the H and I ports. The board is powered via USB from a computer, USB adaptor, battery box or powerbank, but does NOT send keystrokes.  It's self-contained.  In this example, connecting a heartbeat sensor to power, ground and the H port and a servo motor to power, ground and the I port. Both the sensor and the servo motor are powered at the top and bottom and they are connected to the H and I ports.

The sensor controls the servo motor allowing you to adjust the movement of the servo motor, which can have a "pointer" connected to it.  A Lego beam or a straw works nicely.   Make a heartbeat meter, a moisture meter, an EZPass system, etc. Typical sensors are heartbeat, light, moisture, proximity, ...